A compilation of information about Solresol, the universal musical language

Irregular roots

Discuss the grammar of Solresol, including proposed changes.
Couturat & Leau in their “History of the Universal Language” have written about such difficulty of Solresol, as word-formative irregularity, on the basis of words lafalami (it’s not good example, because this Solresol’s word doesn’t have a verb as equivalent) and fasollasol. So, the first root is regular, accent on it’s different syllables signifies a transposition from one part of speech to another:
2-geometre.jpg
(apostrophe in the alphabetical dictionary is a stress mark)

Roots of the second type is irregular, and different accents provides us not different parts of speech with invariable idea (lexical meaning), but variations of one idea, different lexical meanings:
3-fsolso.jpg
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Obviously first French equivalent corresponds to Solresol’s word without accent, second — to word with accent on first syllable, and so on (fifth French equivalent corresponds to Solresol’s word with accent on fourth, last syllable):
4-ship.jpg
(and I can’t find word “brick” in the alphabetical part).

We can imagine regular grammatical meanings of this root: *to navigate a ship, ship, *sailor, *naval, *on the ship (in sentences like “I travel on the ship, by sea”).
I think, that knowledge about irregular roots of Solresol is important only for the history of this language; modern Solresol doesn’t need such complexity (and Boleslas Gajewski didn’t mention this feature) — maybe, only for stylization (e. g., in the translation of ancient texts).
"I think, that knowledge about irregular roots of Solresol is important only for the history of this language; modern Solresol doesn’t need such complexity..."
I agree with you, Shido. This complexity isn't necessary at all, and is in fact *very* confusing to anyone learning Solresol. (Imagine if you didn't know the meaning of the word fasollasol - any accent on it besides the first syllable would leave you unsure about the structure of the entire sentence.)

There is at least one word that I feel benefits from being irregular, and that isn't particularly confusing:
solmire - verb
sôlmire - noun
solmîre - adjective
solmirê - adverb
Solmire.png
Solmire
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The disadvantage to this word is that it makes it difficult to say things like 'adjectival' or 'adverbial'. Perhaps those ideas could simply be expressed by saying things like, "the phrase of the adjective..."?

So far, though, this is the only irregular word that I feel any sympathy for. I'm in favor of the rest being redefined the way Shido said - trying to make a verb base if possible, and going from there.
Garrison wrote:There is at least one word that I feel benefits from being irregular, and that isn't particularly confusing:
solmire - verb
sôlmire - noun
solmîre - adjective
solmirê - adverb
I like irregularity in this case too, because derivatives of this root demonstrates iconic meanings, they doesn’t arbitrary, like in other cases. And, of course, there is word “ladosi” for sense “word” without regard to the part of speech.
Due to post about word doremire (viewtopic.php?f=26&p=918#p918) I have remembered one problem of Solresol, i. e.: in accordance with the book of 1866, emphasis of note (syllable) sometimes is used as a mean of creation of new words for new concepts (not for another part of speech). My reconstruction:
doremire (without emphasis, first line of definition in the ideographical part of vocabulary) = eye;
dóremire (second line of the translation in the ideographical part, first syllable is marked) = Fr. prunelle, Engl. pupil
dorémire (third line, second syllable) = Fr. paupière, Engl. eyelid
doremíre (fourth line, third syllable) = Fr. oculaire, Engl. eyeglass (alphabetical part of book-1866 gives another form with misprint: doremiré)
So we must or remember all these “strange” roots, or change their definitions according to main grammatical rules, for example:
doremire = eye or to use eye (domiremi, to stare)
dóremire = eye
doremíre = optic, ocular, eye (adjective)
doremiré = by eye
I prefer the second variant.

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